Gardening

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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 19 May 2019, 11:52

Going back to a slightly earlier discussion, look at the picture of Row 1 below. Row 1 got covered with pine chips Jul-Aug 2018.

Plants don’t seem to have a problem growing in/right beside the pine chips!
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 22 May 2019, 09:55

I am going to buy a Beurre Hardy pear tree:

This late ripening pear originates in the Anjou region of France where many of our best pears come from. It's a medium sized roundish pear with a deep orangy brown skin with a fair amount of russet. The yellowish-white flesh is fine, juicy, and of excellent flavour. Bears heavily and crops regularly. An instant favourite! Cooks well. Pollination by any Pollination by any other variety of our pears.


https://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/dwarf-pears/111-beurre-hardy.html

Also: https://www.heritagefruittrees.com.au/beurre-hardy-pear/

Just emailed Woodbridge to add a Beurre Hardy—doing it from their online order form I would get slugged for a second $29 postage! Can buy another tree for that!

So, 6 pears for Row 5:
Packham’s, Green Horse (I have seen it also spelled as Greenhorse), Green Horse , Beurre Hardy, Green Horse,Green Horse. These are relatively early bloomers. That is 6 trees, 3 more spots to be filled—next year!

Row 4 will have Beurre Bosc and Doyenne Du Comice plus perry pears.

Row 3 will have Beurre Bosc and Williams plus perry pears. The trees in Rows 3 & 4 are late bloomers, Row 5 early bloomers.

Bees travel down rows of trees, not across so I am pretty sure that is all OK. Work out the bulk of the perry pears next year, mostly the two premium but others too: some trees tend to bear mostly every other year, a nuisance.

Next year I am only going to my block late Sep. Then stay there until mid December. That is going to cause a ruckus but fuck it, sis can get long service leave or something—she will be 69 next year, time to stop working. Be lovely to be there that long, no big time pressures—I did not get a single day off in April! Can explore Tassie a bit. Just need to find suitably cheap accommodation. Shit, love to see the Salamanca market!
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 22 May 2019, 10:15

I will also buy and plant a shitload of comfrey plants, several fennel bulbs and will buy and sow a kilo of lucerne seeds. There is a lavender farm up north I will get to send me lavender seedlings. The more you plant and interplant the better and more robust your garden will be.

Have five grevilleas I never got around to planting in April :oops so better do that next visit: they will survive a winter in pots but not a summer I think.

Next year will plant some understory plants: red and black currants (do brilliantly in Row 2: filtered morning sun but not strong afternoon sun) plus gooseberries, native Tassie pepperberry plant (need male & female) and clivias which love shade. That is a bit of a program of work: 17 perry pears plus the understory plantings.

Have read about making compost tea but one snag: they talk of aquarium aerators and I have no electricity connected. Without aeration you get a stinking mess caused by anaerobic bacteria. I think next year I might make some and aerate by dipping a bucket of water in and pouring it back in from a height several times a day. Don’t want a generator or even a couple solar panels: no sign of power tools and my shed likely won’t be broken into.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 23 May 2019, 16:41

FFS! They had Beurre Anjou so I asked for one. Got a reply today sold out of Beurre Anjou, so I asked for Beurre Hardy! Geez!
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 25 May 2019, 12:54

And Beurre Hardy is useless at pollinating! Oh well, if I get one it will go in row 6: it is a seriously delicious pear.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 27 May 2019, 16:56

Got the Royal Horticultural Society book. Fabulous resource for productive and decorative trees and shrubs!

Also got charged for the Beurre Hardy tree. It produces delicious, juicy pears so all good even if it is a poor pollinator. Will see if I can get a Beurre Anjou from the Vic place.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 28 May 2019, 00:19

Nope :rofl

Ah well, plant the Beurre Hardy in row 6, get a Beurre Anjou next year.
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Re: Gardening

Postby pinkeye » 28 May 2019, 01:51

good luck to you.

I'm busy managing my chilli's and thai coriander at the mo. I'm giving away as much as I can.

Plus a soon to be burgeoning, I hope, lot of parsley.

Main problem tho is containing my Curry Leaf Tree. NEVER plant a Curry Leaf tree in the ground. EVER.!!

No matter how many people you know, or feed.. or whatever. :jump :roll
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 28 May 2019, 02:29

Heh, I know what you mean!

I will plant comfrey around my trees, buy a 100 pots, $495 yikes! Some fennel. The lavender farm I visited when I had to drive all the way to Stockdale to collect the Surround™ kaolin sells seedlings in October, will get maybe a dozen, plant 10 and bring two back. Will buy a kilo of lucern seeds, sow into the mulch. What grows will be slashed in December but it should regrow. Hmm maybe plant clover instead.

Next year understory plants can go in, red and black currants, clivia maybe, some herbs incl onion, rosemary (have to use bought soil to make a well drained spot for it. Will also plant a shitload of agapanthus along my back fence. Plenty of interplanting. Two weeks is such a short time to get things done in, especially with my crap clay soil.
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Re: Gardening

Postby pinkeye » 29 May 2019, 03:01

HBS Guy wrote:……….

Next year I am only going to my block late Sep. Then stay there until mid December. That is going to cause a ruckus but fuck it, sis can get long service leave or something—she will be 69 next year, time to stop working. Be lovely to be there that long, no big time pressures—I did not get a single day off in April! Can explore Tassie a bit. Just need to find suitably cheap accommodation. Shit, love to see the Salamanca market!


Hope you get some really good time there. :beer
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 29 May 2019, 13:31

If need be I will sleep on a cot in my shed. Buy a camping shower, just do number twos in the public loos 10 min walk from my block. Hope to get something less spartan tho. Will buy a fishing rod, do some fishing! Cook the fish in my shed on the portable gas stove I bought but haven’t used. Couple portable solar panels charge a battery + inverter keep computer and phone powered.

Working on what is the final, definite plan for the “orchard.” The green and red lines are to see how the berry bed and cider apple foliage limit will work: bit too tight, will have to move the berry (raspberries and blueberries, maybe some native Tasmanian berries 300mm/1' closer to the long boundary. Hoping the have the berry bed, which will have to be a raised bed because of the acid soil they need, high enough and far enough from any fence the neighbor to my north might build that would shade berries planted too close to the property line. Might have to put up with 800mm/31.5" between the posts and cider apple foliage and the berry bed.

Block is 825sqm/8880.23sqft and my house will be small, a cosy cottage with a roomy conservatory on the back, so enough room for the garden I am planning.

Have been aiming to keep a one metre/3' clear walking path around the trees so I can pick/prune/spray easily and to make sure no weeds growing out from or into my property. To this end the southernmost poles in the three perry pear rows which lean out a bit to help take the tension from the espalier wires were offset 10mm/4" into the row.
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 29 May 2019, 16:33

HBS Guy wrote:If need be I will sleep on a cot in my shed


I suggest you pitch a small tent outside, and then sleep in the shed. That way if some whinging neighbour complains to council you're sleeping in the shed you'll be covered. The shed is not an approved residential structure.

If you have a tent set up and council comes knocking, tell them your sleeping in the tent not the shed. ....it's your own damn business if you want to camp on your land and they can't do fuck all about it
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 29 May 2019, 16:40

If I have a tent might as well sleep in the tent.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 29 May 2019, 17:02

That is a great idea, actually, a tent, a decent tent. The B&B is a nice place, clean, comfortable, friendly people but $85/night so a major part of the budget for my trips to Tassie. Mind, it will get cold of a night there in Sep-Oct. Visit Kathandu for some thermal underwear and overwear!
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 29 May 2019, 17:12

HBS Guy wrote:If I have a tent might as well sleep in the tent.



depends on wind chill I suppose. Provided you haven't got petrol in the shed, you can even have a little camp heater going in the shed ... i wouldn't put anything with a live flame in a tent.



this one on ebay is fairly cheap, and runs on butane so inexpensive to operate. You can even flip it and use it to boil a kettle

https://www.ebay.com.au/i/333194695745?chn=ps
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 29 May 2019, 17:42

Excellent! Have three big gas bottles so gas is not a problem and if it is I take Gaviscon. :bgrin

I have a small portable gas stove from Bunnings for cooking.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 30 May 2019, 07:13

Wow, just wow! That RHS book is just packed with information about pruning and training!

How you hold the secateurs: if wanting to prune a twig entirely hold the secateurs so the thin blade is next to the trunk or the parent branch that way you can ensure the “collar” where the twig (lateral) joins the branch is retained so allowing quick healing of the wound.

On bigger laterals when can you use a lopper and when do you use a curved pruning saw?

Etc etc—this is just the basic info right at the start of the book. It is well worth the money I paid for it!

Oh yeah, staking of a newly planted tree—the two stake method seems best. Trees should be staked low—if staked high the trunk can’t flex and so will not grow thick and strong. Two stakes and web ties are best.
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Re: Gardening

Postby Sprintcyclist » 30 May 2019, 08:39

HBS Guy wrote:Wow, just wow! That RHS book is just packed with information about pruning and training!

How you hold the secateurs: if wanting to prune a twig entirely hold the secateurs so the thin blade is next to the trunk or the parent branch that way you can ensure the “collar” where the twig (lateral) joins the branch is retained so allowing quick healing of the wound.

On bigger laterals when can you use a lopper and when do you use a curved pruning saw?

Etc etc—this is just the basic info right at the start of the book. It is well worth the money I paid for it!

Oh yeah, staking of a newly planted tree—the two stake method seems best. Trees should be staked low—if staked high the trunk can’t flex and so will not grow thick and strong. Two stakes and web ties are best.


Ah, good info.
Thanks.

I found using secateurs with the sharp blade on top when the branch is horizontal enables it to cut much easier.
When cutting harder wood I stress the branch so the sharp blade is on the 'outside' of the stressed branch.
If that makes sense.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 30 May 2019, 15:09

Had a browse of the local Anaconda store. Tents, swags, recliner chairs. There is a battery box, pretty pricy, with 10 outlets incl cigarette lighter outlet, a mains type outlet and two USB outlets—charge the iPhone etc. A 100AH battery—bloody heavy—was next to it. I’d rather buy a 40ah battery and a couple solar panels.

I dunno how long 100ah lasts running a laptop, iPhone, maybe a battery charge for a portable radio. Dunno how long it would take to charge. Will price similar items in other shops—Anaconda is not cheap!
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Re: Gardening

Postby Aussie » 30 May 2019, 16:09

HBS Guy wrote:Had a browse of the local Anaconda store. Tents, swags, recliner chairs. There is a battery box, pretty pricy, with 10 outlets incl cigarette lighter outlet, a mains type outlet and two USB outlets—charge the iPhone etc. A 100AH battery—bloody heavy—was next to it. I’d rather buy a 40ah battery and a couple solar panels.

I dunno how long 100ah lasts running a laptop, iPhone, maybe a battery charge for a portable radio. Dunno how long it would take to charge. Will price similar items in other shops—Anaconda is not cheap!


Anaconda and Katmandu...both way overpriced.
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Re: Gardening

Postby Aussie » 30 May 2019, 16:09

Try BCF.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 30 May 2019, 17:06

Yeah—they have a LiFePo4 battery + container with outlets. No AC type outlet, see if I can get a way to charge the Mac using USB.

By then I will have a newer laptop making this easier.
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 30 May 2019, 17:09

try ebay
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 30 May 2019, 17:10

That too.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 02 Jun 2019, 19:14

I have, somewhere in the shed, a little camp cooking stove. It has an attachment to make toast which is nice. Must try and find it.

Tuesday I might visit the local Apple store, look into USB charging and/or external battery—if I can extend the time the laptop runs on battery great.

I found on Ebay adapters so I can fill little butane containers from my 6Kg propane bottle. Will move one propane bottle in Sep, just making room here.
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