Electric Vehicles this week

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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby Bongalong » 24 Nov 2019, 12:42

DonDeeHippy wrote:
johnsmith wrote:it's not just electric cars either

0 -100 in 2.8 seconds
920 horsepower
up to 600 km range

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2739768/The-sports-car-runs-SALTWATER-Vehicle-goes-0-60mph-2-8-seconds-just-approved-EU-roads.html

looks nice too!

the top one will actually have 800km's range, the Teslas for sale now have 600km's of range and the cheapest one is the same price as their cheapest car, It is definitely different to anything else and will make all these jacked up 4wd's out there now look like princess wagons.....The cheapest one should be about $70,000 here and the most expensive about $100,000 about the same price as a Landcruiser or a Ram.... It will actually be cheaper than them as a 4 door cruiser ute is about $90,000.
Most of the comments I've seen on it have been how ugly it is and the Tesla team have lost their mind, but in the first 12 hours of it being revealed they have already had 200,000 paid reservations for the Ute... :purple

Are you creating some kind of fiction here?
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby Bongalong » 24 Nov 2019, 12:45

Tesla has sensationally revealed its seventh all-electric model, the long-awaited Cybertruck, which while claimed to be the quickest series-production dual-cab pick-up in the world, won’t actually become available until late 2021.

Australian timing for the full-size, six-seat Cybertruck is yet to be confirmed, although a staggered launch from as early as 2022 can be expected, with all three variants confirmed for local consumption.

Either ways, order books for the Ford F-150-rivalling Cybertruck that measures 5885mm long, 2027mm wide and 1905mm tall are open right now for keen buyers, with a fully refundable deposit of $150 required.

Single-motor rear-wheel-drive and dual-motor all-wheel-drive variants will enter production first, followed by the tri-motor AWD flagship in late 2022, which the American EV specialist claims can scare supercars by sprinting from a standstill to 97km/h (60mph) in less than 2.9 seconds, while its quarter-mile pass comes up in just 10.8s. Top speed is 209km/h.

The dual-motor AWD isn’t sluggish, either, completing the 0-97km/h dash in less than 4.5s, while the single-motor RWD is two seconds off its pace. Terminal velocity is 193km/h and 177km/h respectively.
https://www.carsguide.com.au/car-news/tesla-cybertruck-2022-revealed-the-worlds-quickest-ute-is-electric-77072
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby johnsmith » 24 Nov 2019, 18:53

Bongalong wrote:I think all the negative media about trump is crashing the world market!


yeah .... it's the medias fault that the guy's an idiot :grn
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby DonDeeHippy » 18 Dec 2019, 07:06

https://www.tesla.com/en_au/cybertruck
I just placed a reservation for the Cyber truck..... The more I think about it the more I want one, Just about indestructible, good range (800km's probably half that when towing but still 400km's)
It will be in Australia in about 4 years id say..... Base cost will be about $70,000 and that's one with 400km range , I've ordered the top of the range one be about $100,000 plus $8500 for the Autonomous option, the end of this year Tesla thinks they will have all the features finished for it so in 4 years should be about finished, They are adding a solar back as well so probably $5000
so I guess will be about $120,000 all up...I want a light weight aero dynamic 16ft Caravan to tow with lot's of solar panels and a fair battery so about another $60,000 ,$70,000 if I break down and get a Tesla powerwall with it (another 14wkh of battery)..
I'll just sell my house and then on the road I will be, I should be ableto drive about 80km's a day free with the solar panels and free camping, no maintenance with a Tesla, no paint and virtually indestructible body work...My only costs will be food and tyres
long as I'm happy to travel 560 km's a week.
Costs to refill a EV about about 1/4 of a Fossil fuel car, so refilling should cost around $5 per 100km's. Tesla has a great referral program as well so if I can talk a few people into buying Tesla's I get free Recharging per year as well.
Here are some specs for this beast...
https://insideevs.com/news/383691/tesla ... rld-debut/

Range: 500+ miles
0-60 mph acceleration: <2.9 seconds
Towing capacity: More than 14,000 lbs
Payload: Up to 3,500 lbs
Vault length: 6.5 feet
Storage capacity: 100 cubic feet of exterior, lockable storage including the vault, frunk, and sail pillars.
Suspension: 4” in either direction
Touchscreen size: 17”
Body: Ultra-Hard 30X Cold-Rolled stainless steel. If there was something better, we’d use it.
Seating capacity: Up to six adults
Charging: Can be charged at home, at Destination Charging locations, and with our network of more than 14,000 Superchargers, including on our newest V3 technology, which is helpful for long hauls and towing.
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby johnsmith » 18 Dec 2019, 18:36

well done

but i couldn't pre order a car for delivery in 4 yrs time. They change so quickly that in another 4 years you either will get something completely different, or someone else will have come up with something else you might prefer.
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby DonDeeHippy » 19 Dec 2019, 05:23

johnsmith wrote:well done

but i couldn't pre order a car for delivery in 4 yrs time. They change so quickly that in another 4 years you either will get something completely different, or someone else will have come up with something else you might prefer.

It's only a $150 deposit and fully refundable, the reservation just get me in Line and freezes the cost of the Autonomous driving package, Tesla have said that as they get closer to completing the Full self driving the price will keep getting higher..... It takes around 3-5 years for a new car to be born then about another 18 months if they have to convert LHD to RHD so I don't think anything else will come along and especially nothing that look like the Cybertruck :purple
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby johnsmith » 19 Dec 2019, 19:59

DonDeeHippy wrote:It's only a $150 deposit and fully refundable


OK ... that changes things. I would have thought it would be more
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby pinkeye » 20 Dec 2019, 00:16

I'll have one of those. :bgrin :Hi :clap
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby HBS Guy » 20 Dec 2019, 00:24

Yeah, me too!
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby pinkeye » 20 Dec 2019, 00:54

Jeez.. I'd even take a small EV. As long as me and my dog fit..!!
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby DonDeeHippy » 20 Dec 2019, 05:08

pinkeye wrote:Jeez.. I'd even take a small EV. As long as me and my dog fit..!!

Wont need anything else :purple
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby DonDeeHippy » 20 Dec 2019, 06:03

https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-tsla-42 ... lion-loss/

Tesla stock (NASDAQ:TSLA) has set new records once more, with shares breaking the $400 barrier on Thursday’s opening bell. Together with a new record market cap of $72 billion, TSLA stock’s recent displays of strength have given yet another massive blow to short-sellers.
As of writing, Tesla stock is trading +3.00% at $404.96 per share.
Their old high was $390 a share a few years ago and they have diluted the stock since then which makes it even more impressive...
That Puts Tesla at number 3 for Car manufacturers, only VAG and Toyota to beat now....Toyota refuse to make electric vehicles and in the USA are openly siding with Trump on making less economical cars so there is a huge boycott going on there. I personally would never buy a VW after they got caught blatantly poisoning us with only regard to profit... :purple
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby Bongalong » 20 Dec 2019, 15:16

Climate Policy seems to be in the mood for changing: steve price is getting a feel up for a reason...
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby HBS Guy » 20 Dec 2019, 16:04

Looks like Toyota is going to disappear in a decade or two, unless they panic and buy up an electric carmaker or two.

People buying an ICE car will need to watch market value I think. If you have rooftop solar all the more reason to buy an EV and LOTS of people have rooftop solar.
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby Bongalong » 20 Dec 2019, 16:39

HBS Guy wrote:Looks like Toyota is going to disappear in a decade or two, unless they panic and buy up an electric carmaker or two.

People buying an ICE car will need to watch market value I think. If you have rooftop solar all the more reason to buy an EV and LOTS of people have rooftop solar.

Rooftop solar will be the obvious improvement in the intermediate term! The rich got on to it with their holiday homes so the business case is proven... the rest is just long established captains of ICE- who simply don't want to change their well established plant on a whim of course- who have obviously been very very very heavily subsidised courtesy of the absolute need of liquid fuels overtaking solid fuels circa world war one....

Times change... it's all a question of when the policy change happens AND EVERYBODY WITH HALF A DEGREE KNOWS ITS ON LIKE DONKEY KONG...

:beer
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby pinkeye » 22 Dec 2019, 02:06

I hear people saying that the whole process of manufacturing and transporting these vehicles to market will just mean another source of consumption of resources and will contribute heaps to CC,.. not worth the effort, !!

BUT I don't believe that.

Perhaps initially, there will be environmental costs,, BUT... LONG TERM.. we need to get all fossil-burning vehicles , of every variety, stopped removed and replaced with EV tech ASAP.

All ROAD transport... whether commercial or private, and all other travel , should be by zero-emission vehicles.

THAT is what the government should be focussing on. All government fleets should be EV.
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby HBS Guy » 22 Dec 2019, 08:08

Tesla has covered the enormous roof of its gigafactory with solar panels.

The way the world is now car ownership is a given. Whether transporting EVs or ICE vehicles some emissions happen. Over the lifetime of an EV it will emit MUCH less than an ICE vehicle does. Even if more cars are sold because of EVs the savings on emissions by running EVs will see a decrease in emissions overall.

And batteries will increase in energy density, safety and life of batteries. Recycling of solar panels, wind generators and EV batteries will improve the environment.

Nah, just people who fear change (i.e. right wing conservatives) trying to badmouth EVs.

Was funny, YouLiar on OzPol trying to promote “clean” hydrogen cars—with the hydrogen being made using fossil fuels. Has given up on that and is one of those denigrating EVs generally and Tesla and Musk in particular. Won’t work. Bit more economy of scale (China, for one) and the cost of an EV will go down. Tesla (or whoever) needs to produce a mass market model (like my Mazda3) to REALLY see EVs take off.
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby DonDeeHippy » 22 Dec 2019, 09:19

pinkeye wrote:I hear people saying that the whole process of manufacturing and transporting these vehicles to market will just mean another source of consumption of resources and will contribute heaps to CC,.. not worth the effort, !!

BUT I don't believe that.

Perhaps initially, there will be environmental costs,, BUT... LONG TERM.. we need to get all fossil-burning vehicles , of every variety, stopped removed and replaced with EV tech ASAP.

All ROAD transport... whether commercial or private, and all other travel , should be by zero-emission vehicles.

THAT is what the government should be focussing on. All government fleets should be EV.

Even in the worse case scenario where we keep and (shudders) make more coal plants to power electric vehicles we will be better off...
At the moment we throw away enough power to charge over 1 million electric cars
Electric cars use about a quarter of the energy that a Fossil fuel one uses.
In cities it will mean less condensed pollution...
No having to get fuel from other countries especially the middle east...
Of coerce not using coal is even better, if we got rid of Government incentives and tax breaks for fossil fuels and used that money for renewable energy and storage we would be ahead quite quickly.
Unfortunately the top Liberal politicians at the moment all used to work for the fossil fuel industry so I wont hold my breath... :purple
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby Bongalong » 22 Dec 2019, 17:21

HBS Guy wrote:Tesla has covered the enormous roof of its gigafactory with solar panels.

The way the world is now car ownership is a given. Whether transporting EVs or ICE vehicles some emissions happen. Over the lifetime of an EV it will emit MUCH less than an ICE vehicle does. Even if more cars are sold because of EVs the savings on emissions by running EVs will see a decrease in emissions overall.

And batteries will increase in energy density, safety and life of batteries. Recycling of solar panels, wind generators and EV batteries will improve the environment.

Nah, just people who fear change (i.e. right wing conservatives) trying to badmouth EVs.

Was funny, YouLiar on OzPol trying to promote “clean” hydrogen cars—with the hydrogen being made using fossil fuels. Has given up on that and is one of those denigrating EVs generally and Tesla and Musk in particular. Won’t work. Bit more economy of scale (China, for one) and the cost of an EV will go down. Tesla (or whoever) needs to produce a mass market model (like my Mazda3) to REALLY see EVs take off.

The possibility of Hydrogen via solar/renewable power still exists but doesn't seem to be a runner at the moment. Possibly no profit involved... :gsp
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby HBS Guy » 22 Dec 2019, 18:54

Have to truck the hydrogen v sending electrickery down the wires.
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby Bongalong » 23 Dec 2019, 10:45

HBS Guy wrote:Have to truck the hydrogen v sending electrickery down the wires.

Ah, of course!
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby pinkeye » 23 Dec 2019, 23:26

DonDeeHippy wrote:
pinkeye wrote:I hear people saying that the whole process of manufacturing and transporting these vehicles to market will just mean another source of consumption of resources and will contribute heaps to CC,.. not worth the effort, !!

BUT I don't believe that.

Perhaps initially, there will be environmental costs,, BUT... LONG TERM.. we need to get all fossil-burning vehicles , of every variety, stopped removed and replaced with EV tech ASAP.

All ROAD transport... whether commercial or private, and all other travel , should be by zero-emission vehicles.

THAT is what the government should be focussing on. All government fleets should be EV.

Even in the worse case scenario where we keep and (shudders) make more coal plants to power electric vehicles we will be better off...
At the moment we throw away enough power to charge over 1 million electric cars
Electric cars use about a quarter of the energy that a Fossil fuel one uses.
In cities it will mean less condensed pollution...
No having to get fuel from other countries especially the middle east...
Of coerce not using coal is even better, if we got rid of Government incentives and tax breaks for fossil fuels and used that money for renewable energy and storage we would be ahead quite quickly.
Unfortunately the top Liberal politicians at the moment all used to work for the fossil fuel industry so I wont hold my breath... :purple


I am not. But it is seemingly SO obvious... what is wrong with these people.! ?

Umm actually I think I know. They are all more concerned with THEMSELVES, than their responsibilities.

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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby HBS Guy » 31 Dec 2019, 17:54

Parking in the market carpark, in a spot meant for an EV :bgrin and I notice a white car waiting for me to close my door so it can move into the space next to mine. Thought it was a Mercedes for some reason. then I notice it had a big (30 x 30cm?) monitor. It was a Tesla! First one I have seen! A model 3. Owner was gushing enthusiasm for the car. Used to drive a Leaf.

Very nice car! I was green with envy! Plenty of chargers Adl-Mlb, Keith, Horsham, Ballarat etc. 500Km range (only 1 charge needed while I have a break and a meal, not two tanks expensive petrol.
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby DonDeeHippy » 05 Jan 2020, 07:35

Early figure for Tesla this year..

Tesla’s global automobile sales totals:
2012: 2650
2013: 22,300
2014: 31,655 (+41.95%)
2015: 50,580 (+59.8%)
2016: 76,230 (+50.7%)
2017: 101,312 (+32.9%)
2018: 245,240 (+142%)
2019: ~367,500 (+49.9%)
Re 2018: "To put our growth into perspective, we delivered almost as many vehicles in 2018 as we did in all prior years combined."

Looks like they have sold 115,000 this last quarter beating their old best of 97,000 in the 3rd quarter this year.
Overall worldwide car sales are down about 10% this year so they are doing very well..... :purple
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Re: Electric Vehicles this week

Postby johnsmith » 08 Jan 2020, 19:27

Batteries made with sulfur could be cheaper, greener and hold more energy

Lithium-ion batteries have changed the world. Without the ability to store meaningful amounts of energy in a rechargeable, portable format we would have no smartphones or other personal electronic devices. The pioneers of the technology were awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize for chemistry.

But as society moves away from fossil fuels, we will need more radical new technologies for storing energy to support renewable electricity generation, electric vehicles and other needs.

One such technology could be lithium-sulfur batteries: they store considerably more energy than their lithium-ion cousins — in theory as much as six times the energy for a given weight. What's more, they can be made from cheap materials that are readily available around the world.

Until now, lithium-sulfur batteries have been impractical. Their chemistry allows them to store so much energy that the battery physically breaks apart under the stress.

However, my colleagues and I have engineered a new design for these batteries which allows them to be charged and discharged hundreds of times without breaking down. We hope to have a commercial product ready in the next two to four years.

What's so good about sulfur?

Lithium-ion batteries require minerals such as rare earths, nickel and cobalt to produce their positive electrodes. Supply of these metals is limited, prices are rising, and their mining often has great social and environmental costs.

Industry insiders have even predicted serious shortages of these key materials in the near future, possibly as early as 2022.

In contrast, sulfur is relatively common and cheap. Sulfur is the 16th-most abundant element on Earth and miners produce around 70 million tonnes of it each year. This makes it an ideal ingredient for batteries if we want them to be widely used.

What's more, lithium-sulfur batteries rely on a different kind of chemical reaction, which means their ability to store energy (known as "specific capacity") is much greater than that of lithium-ion batteries.
Great capacity brings great stress

A person faced with a demanding job may feel stress if the demands exceed their ability to cope, resulting in a drop in productivity or performance. In much the same way, a battery electrode asked to store a lot of energy may be subjected to increased stress.

In a lithium-sulfur battery, energy is stored when positively charged lithium ions are absorbed by an electrode made of sulfur particles in a carbon matrix held together with a polymer binder.

The high storage capacity means that the electrode swells up to almost double its size when fully charged.

The cycle of swelling and shrinking as the battery charges and discharges leads to a progressive loss of cohesion of particles and permanent distortion of the carbon matrix and the polymer binder.

The carbon matrix is a vital component of the battery that delivers electrons to the insulating sulfur, and the polymer glues the sulfur and carbon together.

When they are distorted, the paths for electrons to move across the electrode (effectively the electrical wiring) are destroyed and the battery's performance decays very quickly.
Giving particles some space to breathe

The conventional way of producing batteries creates a continuous dense network of binder across the bulk of the electrode, which doesn't leave much free space for movement.

The conventional method works for lithium-ion batteries, but for sulfur we have had to develop a new technique.

To make sure our batteries would be easy and cheap to manufacture, we used the same material as a binder but processed it a little differently. The result is a web-like network of binder that holds particles together but also leaves plenty of space for material to expand.

These expansion-tolerant electrodes can efficiently accommodate cycling stresses, allowing the sulfur particles to live up to their full energy storage capacity.
When will we see working sulfur batteries?

My colleagues Mainak Majumder and Matthew Hill have long histories of translating lab-scale discoveries to practical industry applications, and our multidisciplinary team contains expertise from materials synthesis and functionalisation, to design and prototyping, to device implementation in power grids and electric vehicles.

The other key ingredient in these batteries is of course lithium. Given that Australia is a leading global producer, we think it is a natural fit to make the batteries here.

We hope to have a commercial product ready in the next two to four years. We are working with industry partners to scale up the breakthrough, and looking toward developing a manufacturing line for commercial-level production.


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-08/lithium-sulfur-battery-greener-cheaper-and-more-efficient/11849590



I hope they get this working as promised. We need o move away from rare earths.

I think over the next 20 years batteries will go the way of pc's. We used to have pc's the size of a bedroom to do just basic maths calculations. Todays pc's have a thousand times the power, and are no bigger than your mobile phone.

If batteries progress like that you will be able to run your whole house for weeks on a AAA sized battery. :thumb
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