Gardening

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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 02 Nov 2019, 15:07

HBS Guy wrote:REALLY over thinking things



I'll say. I usually go to bunnings, pick a plant from what on display, poke a hole in the soil where I have room and plop it in. I'll water usually for the first week, after that it's on his own .... if it dies i repeat the process a year later :meet
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 02 Nov 2019, 19:27

I need to get the trees started—I do not have time to stuff around.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 03 Nov 2019, 13:06

On the Plants of Tasmania website I found:

Gaultheria hispida—likes shady moist sites, like under the big pergola. And it gives very tasty white berries! The

I will design a path meandering between beds of various shade plants planted in the big pergola. Will be a “stream” and pond at least partly under the pergola with a nice spot with outdoor table and chairs tucked in near the kitchen door—great place to have breakfast in summer!

On the fence:
Coprosma nitida
Currant Bush

Prickly bush to 1.5 m or more. The female plants can be laden with shiny orange berries in autumn. The Silvereyes will tell you when they are ripe. Nice in pies, cakes and tarts.

Etc.

Bad news: grape varieties available in Tassie seem to be limited but I will spend some time visiting nurseries etc and see what can be gotten. Very strict quarantine: the Vic nursery I got some perry pear trees cannot sent grapevines to Tassie, damn it!

Can get sultanas there—need a hot summer, grrrr! But another sultana might be fine. I can dry some.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 03 Nov 2019, 13:14

Some of the grapes I could get I could make some wine from: muscat for example. I can get wine grape cuttings no doubt in July, could plant them all along the fence.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 11 Nov 2019, 14:33

Have started a blog on coping with clay soil, well, made outline notes. Will lead to a blog on growing fruit trees, native fruits (wonder if quandong trees would grow in Tassie?)

Bet that when the pear trees are 1.8m high there will be the odd surreptitious visit by some looking for mj plants among the trees. They will be disappointed. I see this when I grow a bed of tomatoes, the odd footprint several sizes larger than my own.

Hmmm water from the pond that has a lot of fish, inconspicuous/buried pipe drawing pond water off into cellar, flowing into a sink filled with aquaculture beads and a mj plant? Water from that pumped back into the stream where water from the fountain at the end of the pergola is also pumped into the stream via small “waterfall?” The aquaculture removes the nitrates and phosphates from the pond water.

Fish piss and poop in the pond, making the pond water nitrogen etc rich, need to rollover some pond water else too much nitrogen, bacteria etc etc. Aqualculture is using pond water to grow some veges hydroponically. Coriander seems to be a favorite. Here I fill a bucket with pond water, dilute it a bit, water what I want to grow a bit quicker, be nice to do it on a bit bigger scale. I think a quarter of pond water needs to be replaced each year. Lot of value in a pond: flowers like water lillies, Lousiana swamp iris etc, fun feeding the fish (they will attack and eat earwigs, first dashing at it and biting off the big but useless pincers. They will eat mosquito larvae but they leave ants strictly alone. And aquaculture, however simple or technical.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 11 Nov 2019, 15:27

Re clay soil—do NOT add sand. Now, I did but added it with compost and sheep poo. Some clays to which sand is added set like cement in hot dry weather. Any sand you REALLY want to add make it sharp sand. Gypsum is good—for sodic clay soils, soils with sodium ions not calcium ones. Only lasts 3 years.

Main thing: do not walk on it, protect it from sun and rain with good thick mulch, let the soil critters do the work.
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Re: Gardening

Postby pinkeye » 11 Nov 2019, 22:46

All bets are off here in SEQ.

I have many dead natives. Dead or dying. The ground is already so dry. We really need an early wet season. :pope :c

Tomorrow likely 38'....here where I live. There was a fire not that far away from me on Friday... Nov8.., but it was controlled.

All day today the smoke from the fires was so dense you couldn't see nearby ranges.

I am philosophical about it. It happens, or it doesn't. I doubt I will have a problem BUT,
nobody knows.


AND, it isn't even DECEMBER.!! Not good my friends.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 12 Nov 2019, 06:03

Was 36°C here yesterday but will be around 20°C for the rest of the week.

Going to be a long hot summer.
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Re: Gardening

Postby pinkeye » 12 Nov 2019, 23:57

Indeed.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 14 Nov 2019, 08:15

Been pruning some of Mum’s roses. Lots of brown leaves, even some stems. I take that to be fungus? (not Agnes :roll :bgrin )

Problem is, I think my really good secateurs are in Tassie and I have been pruning using a lopper. Think time to go to Bunnings buy some cheap secateurs. And a pair of gauntlets! Need to really prune these roses hard, then spread some cow shit under them. Mum is a bit past giving proper care to her roses. Nevermind, I found enough new blooms to fill a vase for her which made her happy. After the prune a spray with neem oil and Seasol.
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Re: Gardening

Postby pinkeye » 14 Nov 2019, 23:12

yeah they love a hard prune..

sounds about right to me. Seems out of season, but , what ARE they, these seasons?

We are already in summer.
Hope autumn comes sooner too.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 15 Nov 2019, 04:55

Two seasons to prune, for deciduous trees/shrubs:

Winter prune—for shape
Summer prune—for size.

In winter the energy of the plant is in the roots. Prune then and the tree will rapidly replace the pruned branches

In summer the energy is in the leaves, plant cannot rapidly replace the pruned branches.


But these roses I did not prune in winter, they have branches/twigs too close together, no air and light gets to the tangles hence the fungal disease I saw. Have to tackle that.
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Re: Gardening

Postby pinkeye » 15 Nov 2019, 23:55

sounds pretty organised to me. :bgrin :thumb
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 16 Nov 2019, 00:06

Ha! Talking about fire retardant plants—fruit trees and veges are fire retardant plants!

Pigface all around my boundaries, other succulents etc and the trees & vege patch, the gravel mulch close to the house will be good passive grass fire defences. Phew! Some sort of blinds over windows etc.

Was going to espalier the trees around the pergolas, think now just keep them no more than 2m tall will be enough—prune the stem at 45cm so branches form nice and low. Don’t have to decide yet, summer 2020/21 will be the time.

Because the clematis etc weren’t planted in the ground and irrigation provided I may have lost some of them. Can replace in January quite cheaply. Telegardening fucking sucks!
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Nov 2019, 16:03

Found some more books on natives (and an interesting cookbook) in op shops today. Have to pick out some natives that will do OK in Tassie and in my soil (with not that much alteration) and look great—and are not highly inflammable! But that can wait.

Also ran into my niece at one op shop which was really nice.

I look for books on landscaping, garden design, find one that looks good—but full of paths made of pavers or paving bricks, brick or stone walls etc—pavers would be tipped by my clay soil and create umpteen million tripping hazards and a wall on a strip footing—soon be tipped or the footing cracked etc. Anything like that will need to be done by plants: hedges instead of walls, gravel instead of paving. Light wooden structures are OK, easy enough to straighten them if tipped.

Most of my garden is productive: “orchard” in the back and a vege patch in the side yard and a berry patch in the front yard. So not a huge patch I can turn into an interesting garden of more than one “room.” Rooms seem to be the in-thing in landscape design.

John will be happy to know I could plant quite a few Shiraz vines along the fence line and might just do that. 60metres of vines maybe.Once the house is built.
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Re: Gardening

Postby johnsmith » 18 Nov 2019, 17:44

HBS Guy wrote:John will be happy to know I could plant quite a few Shiraz vines along the fence line and might just do that. 60metres of vines maybe.Once the house is built.


shiraz? :grn

tassie has the best climate for pinot noir , forget shiraz
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 18 Nov 2019, 18:47

I like shiraz. . .yes, know pinot noir, thought about it but decided shiraz is better.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 19 Nov 2019, 10:53

Ha! Now you know why Brown Snout cider apples are called that:
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 19 Nov 2019, 11:02

Glad I bought this tree: it bears well every year where Dabinett and Yarlington Mill, vintage quality apples, tend to be feast then next year famine. It makes a nice enough cider by itself and can bulk out YM and D ciders, add a bit of tannin to cider made from the tart King David and bittersharp Improved Foxwhelp. Or I might just ferment the Brown Snout cider, bottle it, drink it while letting the cider from the higher quality apples mature.

Yeah, keg or two (18L postmix keg) of Brown Snout cider sounds good to me.

The King Davids will make great juice as well as cider. When/if I build the apple tunnel get another KD just for juice. McIntosh and Court Pendu Plat apples are aromatic, small percentage of them in the crush for nice apple character to the cider.
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Re: Gardening

Postby HBS Guy » 19 Nov 2019, 14:47

The kegs could sit on the floor under the bar, cellar temperature! Have a trapdoor put the keg in place, fit the gas and beer lines, keep the gas on for a couple days. Bit long beer line but not all that long, keep one keg of sanitising solution, force it up through the line when the keg is empty.

{sigh} my fave antique shop had three of the old beer pumps for sale, would have loved to use those! Not to be!
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