Olympics 2020 day 2 ... China race to 3 Gold. Australia and USA didn't trouble the scorer ... day 17 Gold China 38, USA 38, Japan 27, Australia 17

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Australian women's swim team wins the 4x100m gold in a new Olympic and world record, 3 seconds ahead of Canada and USA.

Men silver in 400m freestyle and Bronze in 400m individual medley.
 
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Japan has 5 golds including 1 by a female swimmer in the 400m medley, 3 Judo, and 1 skateboarding.
 

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Tunisia’s Ahmed Hafnaoui takes surprise gold in the 400m men's freestyle final!

He has taken one of Australia/USA's usual gold medal events.

"The 18-year-old Tunisian, in the outside lane after being the slowest in qualifying, produced a blistering finish to pip Australia's Jack McLoughlin to gold with a time of 3:43.36, with U.S. swimmer Kieran Smith taking bronze."
 

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Ariarne Titmus, 20, beat US rival Katie Ledecky to take home gold in 400m women's freestyle.

Can we expect more wins from her?

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...taboola_feed&ns_mchannel=rss&ico=taboola_feed

Ariarne Titmus wins GOLD! Aussie swimming young gun, 20, STORMS HOME to beat Olympic legend Katie Ledecky in 400m freestyle Tokyo Games thriller
Ariarne Titmus, 20, beat US rival Katie Ledecky to take home gold in 400m women's freestyle

Her titanic victory hands Ledecky, a five-time Olympic champion, her first-ever defeat in a Games final

By AIDAN WONDRACZ FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA and AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS

PUBLISHED: 03:29 BST, 26 July 2021 | UPDATED: 04:58 BST, 26 July 2021

Australian swimming champ Ariarne Titmus has won the gold medal in the women's 400m freestyle at the Tokyo Olympics.

The 20-year-old triumphed in a titanic final on Monday, coming from behind to defeat the United States' five-time Olympic champion Katie Ledecky.

Titmus' achievement is Australia's second gold medal of the Tokyo Games, following the women's 4x100m freestyle relay success.

And it delivers Ledecky, regarded as the greatest female swimmer ever, her first defeat in an Olympic final.

Coach Dean Boxall could not contain his excitement and was spotted erupting into applause, tearing off his face mask and almost throwing it into the stands before breaking into tears.

Titmus snatched victory away from her US rival and five-time Olympic champion Katie Ledecky after recording 3:56.69 minutes +19
Titmus snatched victory away from her US rival and five-time Olympic champion Katie Ledecky after recording 3:56.69 minutes

Australian swimming phenom Ariarne Titmus has won gold and placed first in the 400m freestyle final +19
Australian swimming phenom Ariarne Titmus has won gold and placed first in the 400m freestyle final

Ledecky (in black cap) followed in second place with less than a second difference after finishing in 3:57.36 minutes +19
Ledecky (in black cap) followed in second place with less than a second difference after finishing in 3:57.36 minutes

Golden girl: Titmus beams as she holds up the gold medal for the women's 400m freestyle +19
Golden girl: Titmus beams as she holds up the gold medal for the women's 400m freestyle

Titmus and Ledecky show dazzling sportsmanship congratulating each together following the intense race +19
Titmus and Ledecky show dazzling sportsmanship congratulating each together following the intense race

Titmus and Ledecky dominated the 400m freestyle from the outset with both swimmers vying for first place.

The pair pulled well ahead of the pack by the first 200 metres with a 1.88 second difference between third place Canadian swimmer McIntosh and second-place Titmus.

The Australian snapped at Ledecky's heels for the initial 250 metres in what appeared a cunning plan, but was really mid-race concern.

'Honestly, at the 200 I was a little bit worried,' Titmus said after the race.

'I knew she would be prepared so I guess I had to trust myself.

'I tried to stay as composed as I could and use my speed.'

Titmus ominously dialled up her pace: with 100m to go, she was within 0.16 seconds, and closing.

The Australian then overwhelmed Ledecky, a renowned strong finisher who has five Olympic golds and 15 world championships in a storied career.

Titmus won by half a body-length in a time of three minutes 56.69 seconds, just 0.23 seconds off Ledecky's world record.

Ledecky touched home in 3:57.36 and China's Li Bingjie was well back in third position in 4:01.08.

Titmus and Ledecky will also square off in a much-hyped 200m freestyle battle, though the American is favoured to win their duel over 800m.
 

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At 11:00 PM Japan time, Japan has taken the gold medal lead with 8. USA 7, China 6.
 
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Olympic history:

Let us not forget Ian Thorpe the great Australian swimming champion who retired in 2006 at the age of 24 citing lack of motivation as the reason.

Ian Thorpe From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Ian Thorpe Young man with short blonde-brown hair wearing a dark open necked shirt and zip-up jacket, not cleanly shaven, smiling broadly. The background is labelled with the word 'Brasserie'. Thorpe at Doha GOALS Forum 2012 Personal information Full nameIan James Thorpe Nickname(s)"Thorpedo", "Thorpey" National team Australia Born13 October 1982 (age 38) Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Height1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Weight104 kg (229 lb) Sport SportSwimming StrokesFreestyle ClubSLC Aquadot CoachDoug Frost (1995–2002) Tracey Menzies (2002–2006) Medal record Ian James Thorpe, AM (born 13 October 1982) is an Australian retired[1] swimmer who specialised in freestyle, but also competed in backstroke and the individual medley. He has won five Olympic gold medals, the most won by any Australian. With three gold and two silver medals, Thorpe was the most successful athlete at the 2000 Summer Olympics, held in his hometown of Sydney. At the age of 14, Thorpe became the youngest male ever to represent Australia,[2] and his victory in the 400 metre freestyle at the 1998 Perth World Championships made him the youngest-ever individual male World Champion.[3] After that victory, Thorpe dominated the 400 m freestyle, winning the event at every Olympic, World, Commonwealth and Pan Pacific Swimming Championships until his break after the 2004 Olympics in Athens.[4] At the 2001 World Aquatics Championships, he became the first person to win six gold medals in one World Championship.[5] Aside from 13 individual long-course world records, Thorpe anchored the Australian relay teams, numbering the victories in the 4 × 100 m and the 4 × 200 m freestyle relays in Sydney among his five relay world records. His wins in the 200 m and 400 m and his bronze in the 100 m freestyle at the 2004 Summer Olympics made him the only male to have won medals in the 100–200–400 combination.[4] He acquired the nickname "Thorpedo" because of his speed in swimming. Thorpe announced his retirement from competitive swimming in November 2006, citing waning motivation;[6] he made a brief comeback in 2011 and 2012. In total, Thorpe has won eleven World Championship gold medals; this is the third-highest number of gold medals won by any swimmer.[7] Thorpe was the first person to have been named Swimming World Swimmer of the Year four times,[8][9] and was the Australian Swimmer of the Year from 1999 to 2003. His athletic achievements made him one of Australia's most popular athletes, and he was recognised as the Young Australian of the Year in 2000.[10]
 

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US, China, and Japan tied on 13x gold.

Japan could be headed for their best Olympics ever beating their 16x gold in the 1964 Tokyo olympics.
 

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Big surprise. China 14x gold snatches the lead again in the 4x200 women's freestyle swimming relay.

USA second, Australia third in the 4x200.
 

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An astonishing piece of trivia. A world record that has stood for 38 years and still stands according to Wikipedia.

She and her coach have denied using drugs and there is no evident association with other Czechs that were accused of taking drugs.

https://www.pledgesports.org/2017/08/longest-standing-world-records-athletics/

Jarmila Kratochvílová – 800m – 34 Years
Longest standing world records
Kratochvílová won the 400 metres and 800 metres at the 1983 World Championships, setting a world record in the 400 m. In 1983, she also set the world record for the 800 metres, which still stands and which is currently the longest-standing individual world record in athletics. Only one athlete, Pamela Jelimo of Kenya, in 2008, has come within a second of Kratochvílová’s mark since it was set.
 

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Day 8 time 17:37 and China has leaped ahead to 18 gold, Japan 15 gold, USA 14 gold, ROC 10 gold, Australia 9 gold.

The USA is underperforming compared to past Olympics.

Japan is on track for its best Olympics ever.
 

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Time 22:36 Japan time day 8. Japan has its best-ever Olympics with 17 gold and still accumulating gold.

Japan's 1964 Tokyo Olympics tally was:

Japan
Japan 16 Gold 5 Silver 8 Bronze Total 29
USA stuck on 14 gold, China 19 gold, Australia 9 gold.

Japan, Australia, and China are stealing USA's gold.
 
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Djokovic defeated in the Olympics and the best he can hope for is the Bronze.

"No gold for Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic, the winner of all three Grand Slams played to date this year, will not win the Olympic gold medal.

He was defeated in the semifinals by No. 4 Alexander Zverev, 1-6, 6-3, 6-1, and will now look to capture the bronze medal against Spain’s Pablo Carreno Busta."
 
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